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Iron deficiency

  • The most common nutritional deficiency in the U.S. is iron deficiency. And, women are at greatest risk for obvious reasons that include monthly cycles, childbirth, hormone changes, etc. Without hemoglobin, a protein that helps red blood cells deliver oxygen throughout the body, health cannot be achieved—iron delivers that. When iron is deficient it leads to a disorder called anemia but that condition carries a litany of symptoms that can usually only be medically identified through a ferritin test that measures your body’s iron levels.

    Common signs you may be iron deficient:

    • Lethargy
    • Fatigue
    • Malaise/depression
    • Angina
    • Impaired cognition
    • Impaired immune system
    • Anorexia
    • Intolerance to cold
    • Endocrine/metabolic abnormalities
    • Cardiorespiratory disturbances
    • Gastrointestinal disturbances
    • Tendency toward bleeding
    • Reduced exercise tolerance
    • Weakness
    • Shortness of breath
    • Exertional chest pain
    • Impaired concentration
    • Impaired libido/impotence
    • Insomnia
    • Headache
    • Pallor
    • Neuromuscular disturbances
    • Cutaneousdisturbances
    • Musculoskeletal symptoms
    • Pruritus

    The following are the most common signs you may be iron deficient:

    Monthly Menstrual Cycles — women are often anemic due to heavy periods that significantly reduce blood levels; when iron is deficient, the replacement is only about half of the blood loss and the following month the cycle repeats. According to director of gynecology at Mount Sinai in New York City, Jacques Moritz, MD, the monthly period of a woman should only fill a total of two to three tablespoons each month; if you lose more than that, get your ferritin levels checked.

    Unexplained Exhaustion and Stamina — being overly tired is often too easily dismissed as just part of modern day stress. Most of us, especially women, are so programmed to living hectic lives, being all things to everyone that they easily dismiss symptoms, especially if they’re a single mother. That said, if you’re iron deficient then less oxygen reaches your tissues so your body cannot generate the energy needed.

    Those who are diagnosed with iron deficiency are often labeled as having “tired blood” because they experience weakness, extreme fatigue/endurance, irritability, brain-fog and often muscle weakness.

    Colorless Complexion — hemoglobin is responsible for the red color in your blood and that rosy hue/glow to your complexion, regardless of your skin color, because any skin tone can look pale or sickly. This often occurs because low levels of protein suck the color straight from the skin. Those with a light or fair complexion can easily be spotted. However, those with darker complexions may have to look inside their lips, gums, and inside of their bottom eyelids to see if they’re less red/rosy than normal from iron deficiency.

    Short-winded — when you’re iron deficient, oxygen levels are reduced and can manifest as shortness of breath while doing ordinary tasks that you normally handle without those symptoms, like gently climbing stairs or your morning walk.

    Unusual Heart Rhythms— heart irregularities don’t usually show up with mild iron deficiency. That said, when the deficiency is long-standing or you have been diagnosed with a heart condition, your physician should perform an in-depth analysis if you experience irregular heartbeats, heart murmurs, enlarged heart or even heart failure. The Texas Heart Institute Journal suggests getting your iron levels checked if you have any heart irregularity because iron deficiency can worsen a heart condition.

    Restless Leg Syndrome — according to John Hopkins Medical Center, more than 15 percent of those with restless leg syndrome have been found to also to be victims of iron deficiency and the more deficiency the more symptoms of this syndrome.

    Headaches — if no other known cause is present, consider iron deficiency as a cause of chronic headaches. The brain’s arteries can swell when insufficient oxygen is provided, causing headaches.

    Strange Cravings — yes, there is actually a name for strange cravings like those for ice, clay, dirt, chalk, and paper. These cravings are called pica and it’s often caused by an iron deficiency, according to Dr. Berliner of the National Headache Foundation. So, if you begin to have strange cravings, get your iron levels checked.

    Anxiety and Panic — yes, life is stressful but when iron deficient it can turn that normal anxiety into panic as the lack of oxygen triggers your sympathetic nervous system like putting the “petal to the metal” and speeding up your responses. In addition, the panic becomes fight-or-flight mode as the iron deficiency persists even when you keep thinking, “I have no reasons for this unsettling panic.”

    Vegetarian Syndrome — you may believe that all iron is the same, not so quick! Your body best absorbs heme iron, which is derived from meat, poultry and fish at a rate of three or more times more efficiently than non-heme iron derived from plants. Yes, vegetarians can get enough iron but it requires very careful meal planning and adherence. A good way to get enough good iron is to eat dark leafy greens, whole grains, and legumes that are rich in iron and then consume them along with vitamin C-rich foods like peppers, berries and broccoli that help boost absorption.

    Hypothyroid Syndrome — low thyroid function is unfortunately fast becoming the “norm.” When the body is iron deficient, it slows the thyroid function and blocks its metabolism-boosting effects. If you notice unusually low energy levels, weight gain and inability to lose it in spite of healthy eating and exercise, low body temperature and increased sensitivity to cold, have your iron levels checked and also do the iodine absorption test to see how deficient you really are in supporting thyroid function. To download instructions for the iodine patch test you do at home go to www.gloriagilbere.com and look for “Downloadable Forms” in the tool bar.

    Pregnancy — according to Dr. Moritz, if your pregnant (especially with multiples), have pregnancies close together, regularly vomit from morning sickness or lost a substantial amount of blood during delivery, have iron levels checked. Iron doesn’t get the attention in pre-natal nutrition, as does folic acid for instance, but it should, because not only does the mother need to boost iron levels, so does the baby.

    Tongue Disorders — iron deficiency can reduce levels of myoglobin, a protein in red blood cells that supports muscle health, and that includes the muscle making up your tongue. As a result, iron deficient people complain of a sore, inflamed, and strangely smooth tongue with little color.

    Celiac and Inflammatory Bowel Disorders — because these disorders create challenges in nutrient absorption, additional iron is needed. These disorders cause acute inflammation and damage to the digestive system, be sure to check for iron deficiency.

    Getting More Iron —there is no one-size-fits-all for iron supplementation. However, women between ages 19 and 50 need about 18 mg. daily. If pregnant, increase up to 27 mg. with guidance from your physician. If breast-feeding 9 mg. is usually recommended, check with your doctor. Older than age 50, and not menstruating, you usually only need 8 mg. daily — easy to obtain as a single serving of lentils, spinach, beef, nuts, chicken, or chickpeas will provide your daily dose.

  • Every once in a while a science-backed supplement comes along with amazing properties and the ability to improve the quality of life of millions of people. At TotalHealth we are very excited to help promote IronCatch, one such product.

    Anaemia is a condition in which the number of red blood cells or their oxygen-carrying capacity is insufficient to meet physiologic needs, which vary by age, sex, altitude, smoking, and pregnancy status.

    According to the World Health Organization Iron deficiency is thought to be the most common cause of anaemia globally.

    In its severe form, it is associated with fatigue, weakness, dizziness and drowsiness. Pregnant women and children are particularly vulnerable.

    The problem has been the only solution to date is Iron supplementation which has a host of terrible side effects.

    But now we have a food supplement that solves the above problems. It is called IronCatch.

    Here are the most important takeaways from this amazing product:

    • It's the world's first "iron free" iron supplement and has none of the side effects related to the currently recommended iron supplementations [oral and parenteral]
    • It's the only product worldwide recommended for all those patients suffering from diseases for which iron supplementation is highly contraindicated: Cyrrhosis, Renal insufficiency, Gastritis, Gastric and Duodenal Ulcers, Hemolytic anemia, Rheumatoid arthritis, Anticancer chemotherapy, Thalassemia, IBD-Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Colitis, Ulcerative Recto Colitis, Celiac disease, Crohn's disease.
    • IronCatch is the only oral food supplement which can guarantee an increase of syderemia and ferritinemia by 50% in only 30 days' time, in all of the people using it including men, women, and children where they suffer from Syderopenia and anemia. Other oral iron supplements can take as long as 90-120 days to show effects and even then they don't work at all in a lot of people.
    • IronCatch is highly recommended for women in pregnancy and during breast feeding.
    • There is absolutely no need to add iron to the diet because normal foods contain iron enough for everyone. A very important point, which most doctors are not aware of, is that the iron content in foods correlates in general with their caloric value, namely 6-7 mg of iron per 1000 Kcal . The problem is that this quantity of iron is not usually absorbed. Iron Catch increases by far the captation of iron by certain intestinal mucosal cells, which then transfer the iron to the blood.
    • IronCatch greatly increases "non heme" iron absorbsion which represents the iron most widely found in foods, but is more difficult to absorb.
    • IronCatch is ideal for all people suffering from syderemia who want to have results in as little as 30 days or less.

    IronCatch is the only practical solution for all those people for whom iron supplementation is highly contraindicated.

    We highly recommend this product and would like to know how it works for you if you try it.

    Read Dr. Sherrill Sellman's article on IronCatch in the November issue of TotalHealth: IronCatch: The First Iron-Free Solution for Iron Deficiency

    Website: https://www.iron-catch.com/

  • Have you noticed that you haven't been feeling your normal energetic self lately? Perhaps you have been experiencing symptoms which include fatigue, dizziness, headaches, difficulty concentrating, heart palpitations, sensitivity to the cold, pale skin color, brittle nails, dry hair, cracks on the sides of your mouth, swelling or soreness of the tongue and mouth, or shortness of breath.

    These symptoms could be a sign that you are iron deficient. You may be surprised to learn that iron deficiency is the most common and widespread nutritional deficiency in the world. It is estimated that two billion people are anemic, many due to iron deficiency.

    Who is at Risk?
    Why is iron deficiency such a worldwide problem? As it turns out many health conditions can seriously deplete iron levels. Iron deficiency is especially prevalent amongst menstruating women or women who have excessive blood loss from heavy periods, pregnant and postpartum women, people with conditions that cause internal bleeding, vegans and vegetarians, children, athletes, and the elderly.

    iron deficiency menstruationIn addition, anyone having intestinal health issues such as leaky gut, ulcerative colitis, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Celiac disease or ulcers are especially vulnerable to low iron levels because of a compromised ability to absorb adequate iron from their diet.

    Rheumatoid arthritis and anemia are connected. RA can be associated with different types of anemia, including anemia of chronic inflammation and iron deficiency anemia. When you have an RA flare-up, the immune response causes inflammation in the joints and other tissues. Chronic inflammation can lower the production of red blood cells in your bone marrow. This can lead to the release of certain proteins that affect how the body uses iron.

    What Causes Iron Deficiency?
    Deficiency occurs when the body doesn't have enough of these vital minerals. Iron is essential in order to make hemoglobin, which is a protein in your red blood cells that carries oxygen to your body's organs and tissues and transports carbon dioxide from your organs and tissues back to your lungs.

    When iron intake is chronically low, stores can become depleted, decreasing hemoglobin levels and leading to abnormally low levels of red blood cells. If your body doesn't have enough hemoglobin, your tissues and muscles become starved of oxygen and are unable to function effectively.

    There are two forms of dietary iron: heme iron and non-heme iron. Heme iron is the type of iron that comes from animal proteins such as red meat, pork, poultry and seafood. Non-heme iron, by contrast, is found in plant-based foods like grains, beans, dark green leafy vegetables, fruits, nuts, and seeds.

    Heme iron is typically absorbed at a rate of 7-35 percent, while non-heme iron is typically absorbed at a rate of 2-20 percent. You can see that even though there is better overall absorption of heme iron, there is also a fairly large range of absorption regardless of the type of iron involved.

    IronCatch Absorption levels of Iron

    If the body requires the ability to make more blood or if there is an excessive loss of blood, then there is a greater demand for iron. In the case of intestinal disorders, there is an impaired ability to efficiently absorb nutrients, including iron from food as well as increased risk from gastrointestinal blood loss. Iron deficiency is always a concern for vegan and vegetarians because of their limited dietary choices and lack of heme-producing protein sources.

    The Problem with Iron Supplements
    If you are diagnosed with iron deficiency, it is usually recommended to take an iron supplement. Beware of taking the inorganic form of iron know as ferrous sulfate. Ferrous sulfate is also found in many multivitamins, including children's multivitamins. It is a relatively toxic, inorganic metal that is difficult to absorb. In addition, it can lead to significant side effects which may include constipation, diarrhea, stomach pain, cramps, nausea, vomiting, heartburn, dizziness and fainting, fast heartbeat, and temporary staining of the teeth.

    A New Approach to Safely and Efficiently Increase Iron Levels Naturally

    IronCatch, an all-natural supplement from Italy, is an exciting new product that has recently arrived on the scene. Instead of relying on an inorganic iron product to increase iron levels or trying to increase iron levels with other forms of iron supplementation, IronCatch, provides a novel and effective way to significantly increase iron levels naturally, safely and quickly.

    IronCatch is the first iron-free solution for iron deficiency. It has been proven to rapidly produce significant results within as little as 30 days.1 In fact, in as little as just one week, patients have improved their energy and vitality. This is great news especially for athletes taking part in endurance sport as well as vegetarians, who are known to be at risk from low iron levels.

    IronCatch is a food supplement with a patented formulation that elevates the iron levels by increasing the absorption of dietary iron by an amazing 3-5 times. Instead of supplementing with an iron pill, IronCatch's unique formula is an iron-free alternative that can profoundly increase iron absorption from everyday food consumption with no adverse reactions.

    Unlike inorganic iron supplements, IronCatch has no side effects and is safe for people of all ages. There is no risk of toxic iron overload, which can occur from taking many other kinds of iron supplements. Studies have shown impressive results in people who have iron deficiency and chronic anemia due to Inflammatory Bowel disease, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis.2

    IronCatch is the world's first to solve the iron-deficiency problem by enhancing the absorption of iron from our heme and non-heme dietary choices.

    This patented formula is made from oligosaccharides of specific hydrolyzed fish cartilage, which enhances rapid iron absorption. The formula also includes additional nutrients to support efficient iron absorption demonstrated by in-vitro studies on Caco-2 cells2. They include vitamin C, zinc, copper, vitamin E, and folic acid.

    It is recommended to take one tablet on an empty stomach before a main meal. For more rapid results, take two tablets on an empty stomach before a main meal daily for the first month and then one tablet daily for at least another two months before a main meal.

    In a world where there are so many health issues that can lead to a serious loss of life-enhancing iron, it is exciting to know that there is an all-natural food supplement that offers a proven solution. The best news of all is that IronCatch restores healthy levels of iron, rapidly, effectively, and safely.

    IronCatch truly earns its reputation as the first iron-free solution for iron deficiency!

    References

    1. Minerva Med. 2006 Oct;97(5):385-90. Rondanelli M, Opizzi A, Andreoni L, Trotti R. Effect of treatment with a food supplement (containing selected sea fish cartilage, vitamin C, vitamin E, folic acid, zinc, copper) in women with iron deficiency: double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.
    2. World J Gastroenterol 2007 March 14:13(10): 1575-1578 Andrea Belluzzi, Giulia Roda, Francesca Tonon, Antonio Soleti, Alessandra Caponi, Anna Tuci, Aldo Roda, Enrico Roda. (A new iron free treatment with oral fish cartilage polysaccharide for iron deficiency chronic anemia in inflammatory bowel disease: A pilot study

    For more information or to purchase IronCatch visit their website